Belgian ale

Yeast Is A Rainbow (Really!) : The Complexity of Multiple Fermentations

Yeast is the most avoided element of brewing in America. We tend to obsess over either the hops of our various pale ales, the malts of our stouts, porters, and even our hazy IPAs. But even sours that have become so popular often simplify the phenolic profile by using a “team player” yeast, like the Chico strain, in conjunction with domesticated strains of lactobacillus and pediococcus. The idea is to get a more mechanized dump of lactic acid, which is reproducible, but not as complex in flavor and smell as a lover of lambics might want them to be. A brewery like Ommegang will always be an outlier and considered… Read more »

Brasserie Dupont Moinette Brune

I took this bottle home at the recommendation of my boss, Aaron. He’s into much hoppier beers than I am, so I was only a little hesitant of the recommendation (he hasn’t steered me wrong so far). Typically, Saison Dupont is just a touch too bitter for me to have more than a small glass of, but I was pleasantly surprised with Moinette. Moinette is a bottle conditioned Belgian strong dark ale (there’s a mouthful for you) and, pleasantly, offers up a good amount more malt than its Saison sister. It’s brewed with four distinct styles of malt, lending the reddish-brown hue and intensely fruity aromas. Dated, candied nuts, ripe plum… Read more »